It’s one or the other? Nonsense.

Posted April 6th, 2008 by Joe Kaiser

My attorney just sent me another bill, the bastard.

Dear Rob,

Your guy David Huey is in the press again, this time demonstrating what little he knows about the foreclosure business . . .

david-huey.jpg

AAG David W. Huey

You gotta help or make money . . .— AAG David W. Huey
Sold Out

Seattle Weekly.com

It’s an either/or thing?


the “or” word

I thought I recalled seeing David Huey’s salary posted on some Washington State Employee Salaries website, but I must have been mistaken.

Somehow, though, I don’t think he’s leaving the office without picking up a check, and I’m wondering how that fits with his “either/or” philosophy of making money or providing help.


Royally screwed

My attorney just sent me another bill, the bastard. I thought he was here to help. I guess not.

I didn’t realize attorneys weren’t allowed to both help and get paid for providing their services. Should I file a bar complaint or perhaps a consumer protection complaint with your office?

If help may only be provided freely, then I’ve been getting royally screwed for years.


Help or make money?

Or, as I suspect, does the Huey rule only apply to real estate investors working the foreclosure market?

And as an investor, am I really barred from providing help and getting paid for doing so?

Apparently so . . .

“You gotta help or make money,” Huey says. “If you’re in it to make money, then you shouldn’t be telling people that you’re gonna help them because our experience is they don’t get help in this type of transaction.” — The Seattle Weekly

Nonsense, and more huey.


Extraordinary value

I’ve belabored the point long enough, in part, because it’s so ludicrous. But, that doesn’t stop Assistant Attorney General David Huey. The article continues . . .

The underlying problem, Huey says, is the purchaser’s philosophy: They’re trying to make money off someone’s foreclosure.

Trying to make money off someone’s foreclosure?

Can he possibly be this obtuse?

I provide a service. It’s a “for pay” service. It’s a helpful service. People in foreclosure find my service to be an extraordinary value and gladly put me to work.

They have a big problem – they’re about to lose their home to foreclosure. I have an equally big solution – I can save their home from foreclosure.

See the possibilities?


Twisted

Suggesting I’m trying to make money off someone’s foreclosure, as if that’s a bad thing, is nothing different than suggesting your office is trying to make money off consumers’ problems.

Or divorce attorneys are making money off failed marriages or bankruptcy attorneys are making money off people in dire financial straits.

Only someone with a completely twisted view of the foreclosure business would suggest saving someone’s home is not a valuable service for which investors should be compensated.

Either/or?

David couldn’t possibly be more confused.


Gratis, not

Yes, I know this is news to David, but I can, in fact, both help and get paid for providing a service.

Telling people I can help doesn’t mean I don’t expect to be paid. Sending letters saying I can stop foreclosure doesn’t presuppose I’m willing to do so gratis or out of my own pocket.

And by the way, suggesting, as your office has, that people assume our services are free because we’re offering help is just as ridiculous. I’ve done hundreds of deals with people in foreclosure and I can’t think of a single person who at any time believed my services didn’t come at a price.

Who do you know, in a million years, would assume I’m there on his porch to do anything other than make a profit?

No one, obviously.

People aren’t stupid, Rob, and I wish your office would stop characterizing them as such.


Distorted reality

It’s not an either/or proposition, Rob. Would you mind letting David know?

David has yet again exposed the distorted, “investors: bad,” reality your staffers bring to the table. Clearly, they just don’t get it and they don’t because they don’t want to get it.

If they did, they’d have to admit their “either/or” contention is pure huey and nothing but.

In the arena,

Joe Kaiser


2 Responses to: “It’s one or the other? Nonsense.”

  1. anemonehead responds:
    Posted: April 6th, 2008 at 8:16 pm

    Joe,

    Maybe it’s time to start your own non profit corp to help folks facing forclosure. As an employee of the company it wouldn’t matter what salary you made as long as the company didn’t make a profit.

    I know a couple of guys that are professional fundraisers and do it through non profit corps. The money they make would choke a horse!

  2. Joe Kaiser responds:
    Posted: April 7th, 2008 at 8:05 pm

    I’ve already figured out how not to make a profit, so that shouldn’t be tough.


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